Operation Day.

Bill44's picture
Bill44

Thanks to all of you who have been enquiring by PM. Wrist slashing day has been confirmed as 19th January.
The choice was either wait 15 more months and have it done free, or pay $3,000.00 and have it done in Jan. So far as I am concerned there was no choice.

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carla's picture
carla 2006 December 11

[quote="Bill44"]
Wrist slashing day has been confirmed as 19th January.
[/quote]

Good grief Bill - that does sound serious!

Have you benn donating your own blood before?

Bill44's picture
Bill44 2006 December 11

No blood needed Carla. It's done with "keyhole" surgery, that's why it's so expensive. The surgeon is charging $1800.00 for 30-45 minutes work. The rest is made up of anaesthetist, assistant surgeon, hospital room (6 hours), theatre fees.

SourDom 2006 December 11

Bill,

I know that you don't approve of this pot baking, but perhaps you are taking your protest a little too far...

D

Bill44's picture
Bill44 2006 December 12

[quote="SourDom"]
Bill,

I know that you don't approve of this pot baking, but perhaps you are taking your protest a little too far...

D
[/quote]

Bill44's picture
Bill44 2006 December 12

[quote="TeckPoh"]
Both wrists? How long does it take to recover from the op?
[/quote]
Hi TP, both wrists done at the same time, and the advantage of the "Keyhole" method is that normal light function is basically not interfered with. Normal light activities can be resumed within a day and general hand usage within one or two weeks, full heavy usage and the return of hand strength depends on how much damage has been done to the nerves.

The old open slash method required plaster for a couple of weeks and a minimum recovery time of six weeks.

Jeremy's picture
Jeremy 2006 December 12

Bill as an veteran myself, I was wondering did you a lot of typing in artillery or what......? Jejejejeje

Jeremy

matthew 2006 December 12

Glad you've got a date Bill. Will expect to see bread pics again shortly after - your 10 prong mixture makes "light" work a bread dough doesn't it?

Matthew

carla's picture
carla 2006 December 12

Ahhh Matthew!
This is when Bill will be converted to a pot baker.

As he cannot work hard with his hands and will shortly be hanging out for a fresh bread he will quietly do a couple of folds on a very soft dough and then tip it into his camp oven.

Watch out for Bills best pot bread ever! He will show us what amateurs at pot baking we really are ...

Good luck Bill!

Bill44's picture
Bill44 2006 December 12

Don't have a suitable pot.
Will not buy a suitable pot.
Do have a bloody great oven = Don't need a bloody pot!

SourYumMum's picture
SourYumMum 2006 December 12

Bill,

Excuse my ignorance on the topic of your 10-prong mixer, but are you having a 'carpal tunnel release' or similar?

If so, it's a damn fine surgical procedure which very quickly leads to a vastly improved way of life!!!

Carol.

SourYumMum's picture
SourYumMum 2006 December 12

Fabulous operation, Bill! Can't speak highly enough of how effective it is. Had one hand done after suffering through my first pregnancy in sheer agony - especially at night - gee it was awful, so you have my complete understanding. Other hand has been fine so far, but I wouldn't hesitate to get it done if necessary.

You won't know yourself after the first few days!

You must have a very understanding wife if you're getting BOTH HANDS done at once. I guess she once promised to do 'anything' for you!

SourDom 2006 December 12

[quote]
Don't have a suitable pot.
Will not buy a suitable pot.
Do have a bloody great oven = Don't need a bloody pot!
[/quote]

"I will not bake them in a pot
Not in a jot
even when hot

I will not bake them from the fridge
Not with a smidge
not with a didge

Not in a cloche
not in a Bosch

I do not like them Dom-I am"

I have only
one thing to add

you do not like them, so you say
try them, try them, and you may...

(apologies to the good Dr S)

carla's picture
carla 2006 December 13

Excuse my ignorance on the topic of the 'carpal tunnel release' .

I know it has something to do with wrists,
but what is it, what does it and how do you get it so bad that you cannot sleep?

SourYumMum's picture
SourYumMum 2006 December 13

Carla,

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome. [url]http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/carpal_tunnel/detail_carpal_tunnel.htm[/url]

Mine was not caused by a repetitive strain injury, it developed during pregnancy for some unknown reason. It was [b]extreme
[/b] pain that run the whole length of my arm at night, frequently leaving me exhausted and in tears because there was NOTHING I could do to relieve the pain until after my son was born. At which point I had the carpal tunnel release surgery, endoscopically like Bill is having. The information in the above link says it is done with a local anaesthesia. I asked my surgeon about this and he was said it was easier for him and me to have a general anaesthesia as having a complete 'shoulder block' is apparently quite a nasty procedure in itself - suffice to say after he described it to me I happily opted for a general anaesthetic.

In a nutshell, the 'carpal tunnel' runs through your wrist and contains all the nerves to your hand. If the sheath around it swells, thickens, becomes inflamed or damaged, or collects fluid, it can constrict the nerves causing anything from numbness and tingling, to extreme pain and permanent nerve damage - meaning you can't use your hand. So it's not fun.

A 'carpal tunnel release' simply cuts an opening in the sheath, releasing the pressure, and VOILA! a new improved PAIN-FREE hand.

I hope you never experience it.

Carol.

[/code]

TeckPoh's picture
TeckPoh 2006 December 14

Like Carla, I was clueless as to what CTS was. Sigh. Go get it done ASAP, Bill.

LOL, Dom, I enjoyed that fun rhyme...that reminds me, I owe my 5-yo a Dr Suess book.

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