Carla

Bill44's picture
Bill44

I'd planned to do two batches of two, one hour apart, but it became a choice between two batches or one batch and bacon and eggs for breakfast.

These are two x 750g 1/3 rye loaves, the short fat one was proofed in a 750g banneton and the other one in a 1Kg banneton. No crumb pics as these are just out of the oven.

[img]http://www.sourdough.com.au/gallery/d/4828-1/new_12+Oct+06+002.jpg[/img]

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Bill44's picture
Bill44 2006 October 13

Patience Carla, I don't make bread and then tear it apart immediatley, and you know that rye bread is better with a bit of age.

[img]http://www.sourdough.com.au/gallery/d/4833-1/new_13+Oct+06+002.jpg[/img]

Jeremy's picture
Jeremy 2006 October 13

Wunderbar or wundervol(Ahhh Carla?) Bill!
Just lovely! Can't say how happy I am to have you back amongst the flock!
Will have to have a pint when I get over next year!

Jeremy

Bill44's picture
Bill44 2006 October 13

[quote="Jeremy"]
Will have to have a pint when I get over next year!Jeremy
[/quote]
A pint? Do you yanks only drink small glasses?

Jeremy's picture
Jeremy 2006 October 13

No will have a Liter each to start, share some army stories, lost loves and empire building!

Ta,
Jeremy

Bill44's picture
Bill44 2006 October 13

[quote="carla"]
Whoa Bill - very very nice!

Now what did you call it?
[/quote]
Carla, its a 1/3 Rye loaf, both the starter and the dough are 1/3 rye, 2/3 white bakers flour. It also has some Carroway seeds and molasses in it. I posted the recipe in the Recipe section some time ago.

carla's picture
carla 2006 October 13

[quote="Bill44"]
Carla, its a 1/3 Rye loaf, both the starter and the dough are 1/3 rye, 2/3 white bakers flour. It also has some Carroway seeds and molasses in it. I posted the recipe in the Recipe section some time ago.
[/quote]

The "wink" showed it was tongue in cheek Bill
Don't take it serious!

In Germany a rye bread needs to have more than 50% rye to qualify.

So yours would be a wheat-mix bread (literally translated), haven't got a clue what the proper english - or Australian name would be.

It is what we would call a "country loaf", more wheat than rye.

Every country has different names for their breads and I always wondered how they came to be named like that. What is the "country" part in a bread I wonder? Is it just not formed properly and so splits and looks "rustic"?

I'd like to know where the names come from. Wonder if I could find out somewhere?

SourYumMum's picture
SourYumMum 2006 October 14

Oh tasty, tasty ... very nice Bill!

Is this your rye flour from Bibina? What size bags does it come in?

I want to try some ... and those nice loaves convinced me.

Carol.

Bill44's picture
Bill44 2006 October 14

[quote="carla"]
In Germany a rye bread needs to have more than 50% rye to qualify.
[/quote]
(To the voice of Sgt. Schultz)
Achtung! Achtung! Starter for 60% Rye loaf is brewing Now!

Bill44's picture
Bill44 2006 October 14

[quote="SourYumMum"]
Oh tasty, tasty ... very nice Bill!

Is this your rye flour from Bibina? What size bags does it come in?

I want to try some ... and those nice loaves convinced me.

Carol.
[/quote]
Carol, this is indeed the rye from Bibina. Last time I was there they were bagging it in 2Kg lots instead of their usual 5Kg. They were a bit stunned when I took 10Kg of it.

carla's picture
carla 2006 October 14

[quote="Bill44"]
(To the voice of Sgt. Schultz)
Achtung! Achtung! Starter for 60% Rye loaf is brewing Now!
[/quote]

Hmmm - not sure who Sgt. Schultz might be??

But very interested in your rye bread.
Do you send overseas??

Bill44's picture
Bill44 2006 October 14

[quote="carla"]
Hmmm - not sure who Sgt. Schultz might be??

But very interested in your rye bread.
Do you send overseas??
[/quote]

Here's one that will try you out.

PALLADIN
Have mixer, will travel.

carla's picture
carla 2006 October 14

[quote="Bill44"]
Here's one that will try you out.

PALLADIN
Have mixer, will travel.
[/quote]

Are you now talking in riddles Bill?

Here is my research:
1. Palladin is localized in cells to stress fibers and cell adhesion (Parast & Otey, 2000). Palladin is homologous to myotilin, a structural protein of the striated muscle Z-disc, but palladin is present in smooth muscle and non-muscle tissues, where is co-localises to stress fibres and cell adhesion plaques (Parast & Otley, 2000)

2. [url=http://www.jlpfoundation.org/][b]Jean-Louis Palladin[/b][/url]

3. The name, meaning, and origin of Palladin:
Meaning: fighter
Gender: M
Origin: Native American

4. A [b]paladin[/b] in poetry is any of the twelve legendary chivalrous retainers of Charlemagne (the Twelve Peers) in medieval chansons de geste and stories of romance. They are thus loosely based on historical Frankish retainers of the 8th century and events such as the Battle of Roncevaux Pass and the confrontation of the Frankish Empire with Umayyad Andalusia in the Marca Hispanica.

The word evolved from the Latin word palatinus "belonging to the Palatine Hill", where the house of the Roman emperor was situated since Octavian. Also from palatine developed the word palace, so that a paladine was in one sense a palace official, cf. Palatini. The palace of the twelve paladines above is the Carolingian court; compare the titles of "mayor of the palace" and "count palatine". The original Middle French form is palaisin. The English paladin was loaned into Early Modern English from the Italian form, paladino, because late medieval treatments of the "Matter of France" were mostly by Italian authors such as Ludovico Ariosto and Matteo Maria Boiardo.

Any more??

nina 2006 October 14

Bill, that rye looks mouthwatering to me! Look at the texture of that crumb
I want to eat it with butter and a good salami, mmmm!

What kind of rye flour are you using? Here in Denmark rye flour is easy to come by and as cheap as white flour, but always as wholewheat. "Sifted rye" is used in many factory-made ryebreads but I've never come across it in a store or supermarket.

Looking forward to seeing your 60% rye

Bill44's picture
Bill44 2006 October 14

Carla, many moons ago there was a TV show, my god I'm showing my age here, about a hired gun called Palladin. He handed out cards that said, PALLADIN, Have gun will travel.

Bill44's picture
Bill44 2006 October 14

Nina, I'm using a fine sifted rye that only has a little of the bran in it. The molasses in the loaf helps with a good taste.

carla's picture
carla 2006 October 15

[quote="Bill44"]
Carla, many moons ago there was a TV show, my god I'm showing my age here, about a hired gun called Palladin. He handed out cards that said, PALLADIN, Have gun will travel.
[/quote]

That is where the problem lays!
I have [b]no tv[/b]

Bill44's picture
Bill44 2006 October 15

[quote="carla"]
That is where the problem lays!
I have [b]no tv[/b]
[/quote]
Actually you would have needed a TV some 40+ years ago.

carla's picture
carla 2006 October 15

[quote="Bill44"]
[quote="carla"]That is where the problem lays!
I have [b]no tv[/b]
[/quote]
Actually you would have needed a TV some 40+ years ago. [/quote]

Ah - didn't have tv then either...

carla's picture
carla 2006 October 12

[quote="Bill44"]
These are two x 750g 1/3 rye loaves
[/quote]

Ah - you nearly gave me a heart attack - seeing my name on the board all in lights - sigh!

You mean you had 2/3 wheat flour and 1/3 rye flour in these loaves?
They do look very good. Will be interested in the crumb picture tomorrow.

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