Third time (over)proves it!

Proving timelineUnder the clocheOver-proved and over-slashed?Not too crumby at all!

Well, there were a few differences of note with my third bake. The recipe was the same with SourDoms Pane francesa.

My new starter had passed its fourteen dayversary and after its last feed and a couple of hours at room temperature, it had been placed in the fridge for a couple of days. Took it out the night before to warm up and started the batch of dough in the morning.

This time allowed a 30min autolyse rather than the all in together approach and immediate start to working used previously. After the autolyse phase, I added the salt and mixed with 10sec kneads over 30min. It was very interesting the way the character of the dough changed.

Then followed 3hr of pre-ferment with stretch and fold at hourly intervals. Have also watched some videos on stretch and fold techniques so felt I was doing a better job on this but perhaps it doesn't matter whether your technique is perfect or not, as long as it happens.

Shaped the dough and set to prove in my trusty colander lined with rye flour dredged tea-towel and covered with a damp tea-towel. The ambient temperature was a little lower than it has been previously (didn't check actual values though) and the rise seemed to be a little less/slower and so I opted to give an extra hour.  The picture shows the progress of the rise over time.

Applying the lame had its moments as I tried to get a bit of an under-cut and the blade got a bit caught up and the cuts ended up a bit longer than was perhaps optimal.  I think this and the longer proving allowed to loaf to relax just a little too much.

The next difference came in the baking.  I removed the baking tray and reverted to the simple rack with the baking tile and baked for the first 15m under a large ceramic bowl. I did not pre-heat the bowl. Just for the record, here is another 'oven' shot.

The upshot of all this was that the finished loaf was perhaps not as well rounded as one would have liked but the crust was nice and crackled merrily as the loaf cooled after coming from the oven.

After waiting the bare minimum time to allow the crumb to cool and set we made the cut to have with our evening meal and though the loaf might not have been perfect, the eating was just fine.

 

 

 

5 comments

Looks wonderful. Nothing a stick of butter couldn't cure. Actually all it really needs is a torn off piece in my hand. I love baking under a bowl. It is so much easier than steaming. I use a stainless steel bowl as it is so easy to handle. I would be afraid of dropping that large bowl as I was quickly removing it after 20 minutes. Finishing my baking in a dry oven really gives a nice crust. I love that crackle. 

 

Thanks very much for so many photos of the process and the result.  This really helps me as I am staring at my starter, and then at the dough, trying to figure out what it "should" look like.  By the way, yours does look really wonderful.  I am still hopeful that I can figure it out.  I am waiting to ask more questions here until I have good documentation of times, recipes, hydration and photos.

Yummy, Yummy, Yummy,  looks like love for the tummy!!  Nice shape, color and crumb.  And the third time is the charm.  It's not just luck anymore.  You have the feel.  Congratulations!

 

I was, as you all suggest, very easy to eat either plain as an accompaniment or with the makings for a sandwich.  Just about to fire up the starter for another bake tomorrow.  I'll let you know how it goes.

i think that loaf looks damn good bakin under a bowl is a bit pointles i steam all of my bread but ater ten minutes open the door and let any surplus steam out and reduce temp gives a very good result but with less chance of burnin the hands of yourself tryin to lift out a big bowl. and a bowl not pre heated just absorbs precious heat that should be goin in to your fine sourdough.

give this method a try .